JohnnyExpress

It's 2150
There are all sorts of Aliens living throughout space.
Johnny is a Space Delivery Man who travels to different planets to deliver packages.
Johnny is lazy and his only desire is to sleep in his autopilot spaceship.
when the spaceship arrives at the destination, all he has to do is simply deliver the box.
However, it never goes as planned. Johnny encounters strange and bizarre planets
and always seems to cause trouble on his delivery route.

Will he be able to finish his mission without trouble?



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Jelly Doughnut on Mars Mystery Solved!

Jelly Doughnut on Mars Mystery Solved!
No one had ever seen anything like it in the quarter-century of exploration on the surface of Mars. It appeared in front of the Opportunity rover as if it had fallen from the sky, and its resemblance to a jelly-filled doughnut stoked the media's interest all the more. But the show's over, folks. NASA announced today that, once Opportunity turned to get a clear view of where it had roved from, it was obvious - as mission scientists had speculated - that a rover wheel had rolled over a rock (center), broken off a bit of it, and sent the chip downhill to where it was seen days later. The dark red "filling" could have formed geologically recently after erosion exposed the rock at the surface, scientists said, or it could have formed long ago deep within Mars. End of story. On to the next rock.



A Blue Alien World

A Blue Alien World


Scientists have for the first time discerned the true color of an exoplanet. The world, which orbits a star about 63 light-years from Earth, is a beautiful azure blue, but that's not because it sports inviting turquoise oceans. In fact, it's a huge gas giant where 1000°C, 7000-kilometer-per-hour winds are thought to be laced with silicate particles, which scatter blue light back into space. (So, in essence, the planet is a howling blast furnace where it rains sand and glass.) Scientists were able to determine the planet's color because its orbit carries the body behind its parent star as seen from Earth. At times when the planet is hidden, the amount of light reaching sensors at blue wavelengths drops dramatically while others remain relatively constant, the researchers will report in a forthcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Previous studies of the so-called hot Jupiter have suggested that the planet was blue, but the new data truly pin down the color, the researchers say.



The Sun's Twisted Tail

The Sun\'s Twisted Tail
NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft has stared back "downwind" to look at the sun's own tail. Much as the sun's solar wind blows out the tails of comets, the vanishingly thin stuff between the stars blows the charged particles and magnetic fields of the solar wind back into a tail. The effect is much the same as when the sun's "wind" of charged particles and magnetic fields blows a comet's gas and dust into a tail. Most stars have such tails, as here imaged by telescopes. IBEX rendered the sun's "heliotail" by recording uncharged atomic particles streaming toward it from the direction of the tail. Contrary to predictions, the sun's tail is slightly twisted by the interstellar magnetic field and reflects the varying intensity of solar wind emissions back on the sun. As best as IBEX researchers can tell, the heliotail disperses some 1000 times farther from the sun than is Earth.



Some Young Planets May Be Mirages

Planets emit no light of their own, so observers hunting for worlds orbiting other stars usually detect them indirectly. Now, one such technique has come under fire. The gravity of a planet circling a star in a dusty disk can carve gaps in the disk. But as researchers report online today in Nature, if the disk harbors as much gas as dust, the gas can cause the dust to clump into rings with sharp edges - even in the absence of planets. The best-known example, the scientists say, may be Fomalhaut, a bright star located just 25 light-years from Earth. Its dusty disk (red in the image; the white dot is the star) has a ring suggestive of a planet, which observers later claimed to see directly. However, that discovery has proven controversial, and the researchers say that if Fomalhaut's disk has gas - no one has yet seen any - then the star could have no planets at all.
Some Young Planets May Be Mirages



Venus, Doomed From the Start?

Venus, Doomed From the Start?
Was young Venus an Eden or a hell? Though the planet is closer to the sun than Earth is, our star was dimmer in those early years, so Venus - about the same size and mass as Earth - may have been cool enough to host oceans and even life. But new work published online today in Nature dashes that hope. Both Earth and Venus were born hot, with molten surfaces and probably thick steam atmospheres. Because Earth was farther from the sun, however, its surface cooled and solidified fast, within 4 million years; when rain fell out of the steamy atmosphere, it landed on solid ground and created oceans. In contrast, the new calculations indicate that Venus was probably doomed: Its proximity to the sun kept its surface hot and molten for up to 100 million years, preventing the formation of oceans. Instead, during that lengthy time, steam remained in the air, so sunlight split the water vapor into hydrogen and oxygen. The lightweight hydrogen escaped into space, leaving Venus dry and barren forever.